Tag Archives: Flawed

Flawed by Cecelia Ahern

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flawed

Title: Flawed

Author: Cecelia Ahern

Publisher: Feiwel and Friends

Expected Publish Date: April 5, 2016

Pages: 368 pages


Celestine North lives a perfect life. She’s a model daughter and sister, she’s well-liked by her classmates and teachers, and she’s dating the impossibly charming Art Crevan.

But then Celestine encounters a situation where she makes an instinctive decision. She breaks a rule. And now faces life-changing repercussions.

She could be imprisoned. She could be branded. She could be found FLAWED.


When everybody in a community, in a society, that strives for perfection — perfect grades, perfect demeanor, perfect body, perfect reputation, perfect everything, what does it mean to be Flawed?

Flawed are the citizens who have made moral or ethical mistakes in society. The location on where you get branded with F varies per mistake. On top of that, you have to wear an armband with  a big honking red F to make an example out of you; to remind the good citizens of Highland to never make a mistake.

Flawed is written in a first person point of view by Celestine North. She started by describing her family, her relationship with Art Crevan, and Judge “Bosco” Crevan. She also went in detail how the Guild works, and its “justice” system.

Life seemed perfect for Celestine. . .

However,

Will she stand up for what’s right, or will she lie to keep her perfect life?


 

Flawed was a controversial read for me and its blurb did not do any justice to its content. If the characters weren’t in their teens, this could easily pass as an adult fiction. This book is a mixture of the idea of Divergent (Janine wanting to get rid of Divergents thus keeping society “pure”), a modern version of The Scarlet Letter (the red A and the isolation and ridicule that comes with it), and The Hunger Games (when they want to use her as a symbol for change/rebellion).

The book had more talk than I really wanted, but it certainly kept my pulse up when there’s action. It tackled prejudice, discrimination, segregation, isolation, and bullying. Flawed also has espionage, secrets, lies, and betrayals. Nobody helps a Flawed girl for free. Everybody has a hidden agenda for themselves.

So what makes this book a Young Adult book?

Besides their age, here are a few things that reminded me that Flawed is a YA book.

  1. “Art’s decision to stay away from me. . .hurts more than any branding.” Celestine was branded multiple times with hot cast iron (with anesthetic, the last branding without) and I am sure she was in a lot of pain not to mention the pain while the scars are healing. After being judged as Flawed, she was singled out, hated on, spat at, reputation ruined, future uncertain, and all Celestine could think of is her boyfriend? As a feminist, I would prefer girls portrayed strong and not worrying about any lanky boy for their happiness (no matter how gorgeous their blue eyes are).
  2. “If I have power to bring down Crevan, then I will do it. Then Art and I can be together.” Again, really? Why does the lead female character have to have a boy as a reason to fight? Why not, “Because Crevan is a conniving SOB who used his power for his own gains and literally ruins anybody who goes against him?” or because “He turned against me when I did not allow him to use me for his benefit?”
  3. “Who’s Logan?” After being gone for God knows how long, Art shows up to find Celestine. Instead of asking how she’s holding up, the first thing that came out of his mouth was petty jealousy. I just can’t with this boy.

However, even if the book has some shallow parts, I cannot deny the fact that I LOVE how the author tried to have diversity of the characters.

  1. Celestine’s dad is black and her mom is white.
  2. Mr. Berry has a husband.
  3. Devon sleeps with boys “even if his parents wished he didn’t.”

Overall, Flawed was a good pick me up from not being able to read for a good four months. Will I buy the printed version? Maybe. Do I recommend this book? Yes, to those who loved The Hunger Games, Divergent, and The Scarlet Letter.

Disclaimer: I received this ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars